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Things that nurses want for Valentine


Humour, Jokes, Laughter, Patients, Way of Life


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Let’s be real—chocolates and flowers are nice any time of the day or night, but when it comes to romancing nurses, there are some clear ways to their hearts. If you’re looking at enticing a nurse in your life this year for Valentine’s Day, or if you’re a nurse wondering if anyone truly understands the desires of your heart, let us just be the ones to say:
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Down Time – The Healthy Mind Platter (4/8)


Daily Life, Neuroscience, Theoretics


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Downtime – Disconnecting for integration and insight

When explaining “down time” in workshops we found that this is the most counterintuitive component of the Healthy Mind Platter and needs quite a bit of explaining. “Down time” does not correspond with “leisure time” exactly, which is a much broader term which may refer to hobbies and sports. in the Healthy Mind Platter hobbies are more likely to come under “focus time” and sports under “physical time”. With down time we refer to a very specific type of “activity”: Read More

Improving Your Sense of Humour


Daily Life, Humour, Laughter, Theoretics


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A good sense of humour can make you the life of the party. Maybe you’re looking to be the fun one in your friend group, make a cute girl in your class laugh, or impress your new coworker. No matter your reasons, you can become a funnier person by using different forms of comedy, practicing, and using your body language. You’ll have everyone roaring with laughter before you know it!
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Play Time – The Healthy Mind Platter (3/8)


Daily Life, Neuroscience, Theoretics


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Play time – The joy of experimenting with life

Play, which may seem like a frivolous, unimportant behavior with no apparent purpose, has earned new respect as biologists, neuroscientists, psychologists and others see that play is indeed serious business and is perhaps equally important to other basic drives of sleep, rest, and food. Neuroscience research reveals that play-joy is a basic emotional system and essential in child development and adult creativity and learning. It has been suggested that play is an important behavioral tendency that does not require learning, is an “experience-expectant” process that has adaptive neurodevelopmental effects which promote later adaptive behaviors and which help program higher brain regions involved in emotional behaviors.
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