Daily Life

Humour Helped me Bounce Back


Daily Life, Humour, Laughter, Way of Life


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One of myy daughters told me this joke today. “Why did the students eat their paper?” I paused. “Because their teacher told them it was a piece of cake!”. I paused again and then laughed out loud. Really laughed. A happy, joyful laugh. And then I laughed again. When was the last time you had a good belly laugh? That you laughed so hard your stomach hurt?

Physical Time – The Healthy Mind Platter (7/8)


Daily Life, Neuroscience, Theoretics


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Physical Time – Improving the brain’s plasticity through exercise. In an article in the New York Times, Sandra Aamodt and Sam Wang, respectively editor in chief of Nature Neuroscience and associate professor of molecular biology and neuroscience at Princeton take a critical look at computer programs to improve brain performance. The digital brain health and fitness software market is a booming business.

The importance of Humour in nursing


Daily Life, Humour, Jokes, Way of Life


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The nursing profession is notoriously high-pressure profession. Especially in the times we live in now with this corona pandemic. Many patients that nurses encounter are in a grave state of need, and nurses may not always meet their patients’ needs, despite their best efforts. With so many individuals needing a coping mechanism (please read this blog also), it’s no wonder that many people turn to the power of humour and laughter.

Connecting Time – The Healthy Mind Platter (6/8)


Daily Life, Neuroscience, Theoretics


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Connecting time – The healing power of relationships According to Matthew Lieberman, one of the founders of social cognitive neuroscience, our “evolutionary wiring predisposes us to be social,” actually causing a sense of physical pain if we are socially rejected. As such one could argue that social connection is a basic human need, very much like water, food and shelter. social support is a well-documented antecedent of wellbeing.

Humour a Coping Mechanism for Caregivers


Daily Life, Humour, Patients, Way of Life


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Nurses, physicians, and other health care professionals cope daily with the reality and horror of illness, suffering, and death. If you are unable to cope effectively with this, you would experience “a burnout” or more accurately called “a compassion fatigue”. Your compassion and caring may leave you vulnerable to feelings of sympathy for those we serve.