Laughter

4

Do you have a Sense of Humour


Daily Life, Humour, Laughter, Way of Life


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A sense of humour can be a person’s greatest asset. This skill can help you interact easily with others, improve your health, and even help diffuse difficult situations. What’s not often understood is that you don’t have to be funny to have a sense of humour, you just have to learn to see the lighter side of things.

Spreading Laughter


Daily Life, Humour, Laughter, Theoretics


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Spreading laughter is the next best thing to laughing yourself. When you set out to spread laughter, you’re also spreading joy, happiness, and love for other people. Long considered “the best medicine”, laughter has power; it can lighten up the atmosphere, bring a group of people together, help people to feel good about themselves, and make a challenging day so much easier to face. Even tears are changed by a good laugh, turning into tears of joy and hilarity.

Making a Pun


Humour, Jokes, Laughter, Theoretics


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Paronomasia is the formal name given to the kind of word play commonly known as a “pun.” While many might groan at “dad jokes” that are often puns too bad ”not” to laugh at, a pun well done can impress the palate of even the most discerning connoisseur. An apt pun at the right moment can have a strong effect on those who hear it. To make puns yourself will require a knowledge of the kinds that exist, as well as an understanding of context, timing, and lateral thinking.

Telling a Joke


Funny Stories, Humour, Jokes, Laughter, Theoretics


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From one-liners to classic three-liners to the one-minute gag you tell your friends, a good joke pleases everyone. Joke-telling is one of the best ways to ease tension, make a new friend, or light up a room. That is, of course, if you can get a laugh. Telling good jokes is an art that comes naturally to some people, but for others it takes practice and hard work.

Philosophy of Humour


Humour, Laughter, Theoretics


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Although most people value humour, philosophers have said little about it, and what they have said is largely critical. Three traditional theories of laughter and humour are examined, along with the theory that humour evolved from mock-aggressive play in apes. Understanding humour as play helps counter the traditional objections to it and reveals some of its benefits, including those it shares with philosophy itself.