Stay Funny


Humour, Laughter, Way of Life


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Within scientific circles, humour is often treated as a “non-serious” topic. According to the article “The Importance of Humor Research” by Peter McGraw in Psychology Today, many scientists fear that their work would be disrespected if they dared to research the what, why, and how of humour. Yet, humour deserves much more reverence than professionals — other than professional comics — are willing to bestow upon it.
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9 Ways That Humour Heals


Healing, Humour, Laughter


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Of all my tools to combat depression and negativity, humour is by far the most fun. And just like mastering the craft of writing, I’m finding that the longer I practice laughing at life—and especially its frustrations–the better I become at it, and the more situations and conversations and complications I can place into that category named “silly.”
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The healing power of Humour – Part 1


Healing, Humour, Theoretics


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Facing our psychological issues is difficult, confronting and painful. Remember the old adage, “There’s safety in numbers.” It’s true. But there is solace there too. Misery loves company. I feel much better knowing that the Brazilian Fire Ants are stinging you too. The first-person plural, as in “we” is a comforting word. Loneliness is corrosive. “We” is a kinder word than “I”.
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Humour: The hidden power


Healing, Humour, Laughter


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Philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein said, “A serious and good philosophical work could be written consisting entirely of jokes.” Despite the buffoonish imagery that comes to mind when one considers the joker, the clown or the pie-in-the-face comedian, humour is more than mere silliness. It is an advanced intellectual means of developing new perspectives and coping with extreme circumstances.. Read More

Humour & Healing


Healing, Humour, Theoretics


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If we do not address the heart, help to support the spirit and coping elements of the patient, we may ‘heal’ a short term medical problem but have ignored the patients emotional resolve to have long term success. When things don’t go the way we expect, we have to laugh!

If you go into a patient room to do the initial assessment, you want to be sure to assess the entire patient. In documenting the assessments, a clock model is used to reference the location of wounds, scars, devices etc. An actual clock does not work with only one hand nor does the body work without key body parts. If we do not address the heart, help to support the spirit and coping elements of the patient, we may ‘heal’ a short term medical problem but have ignored the patients emotional resolve to have long term success. Socrates knew his stuff! Read More