Down Time – The Healthy Mind Platter (4/8)


Daily Life, Neuroscience, Theoretics


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Downtime – Disconnecting for integration and insight When explaining “down time” in workshops we found that this is the most counterintuitive component of the Healthy Mind Platter and needs quite a bit of explaining. “Down time” does not correspond with “leisure time” exactly, which is a much broader term which may refer to hobbies and sports. in the Healthy Mind …

Play Time – The Healthy Mind Platter (3/8)


Daily Life, Neuroscience, Theoretics


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Play time – The joy of experimenting with life Play, which may seem like a frivolous, unimportant behavior with no apparent purpose, has earned new respect as biologists, neuroscientists, psychologists and others see that play is indeed serious business and is perhaps equally important to other basic drives of sleep, rest, and food. Neuroscience research reveals that play-joy is a …

Sleep Time – The Healthy Mind Platter (2/8)


Daily Life, Neuroscience, Theoretics


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Sleep time – Refreshing mind and body, and consolidating memory. Sleep is a highly complex and vital process which is essential for the biological balance of the mammalian organism (Benington, 2000), and thought to be critical for homeostatic restoration, thermoregulation, tissue repair, immunity, memory processing, and emotion regulation. Accordingly, sleep deprivation can more lethal than food deprivation.

An introduction to The Healthy Mind Platter (1/8)


Daily Life, Neuroscience, Theoretics


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The Dutch and the US government have the food pyramid – the diagram that’s been with us for decades that is supposed to remind people how to eat well. The model is called Choose my plate , is a big improvement. However, there’s a different epidemic happening out there that’s getting less attention, perhaps because it is less obvious than …

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Damned if You Do, Damned if You Don’t: The Dilemma of Disclosing Autism


Autism, Daily Life, Neuroscience, Way of Life


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“…Brain variations are normal and should be respected, just like differences in gender and race. People with autism, according to this philosophy, aren’t abnormal. It’s just that they might need some extra support to live in a society built with “neurotypical” people in mind.” Microsoft Wants Autistic Coders. Can It Find Them And Keep Them? I have no regrets in …