Laughter Is the Best Medicine


Humour, Laughter, Theoretics


, , , , , , ,

Modern life has become increasingly complicated and it’s believed that stress is the primary obstacle to laughter. Laughter is a physical expression of humor and joy that has numerous protective qualities. It’s one of the best ways to manage perceptions of stress and to develop resilience and improve psychological sturdiness as it strongly correlates with happiness.

The importance of Humour in nursing


Daily Life, Humour, Jokes, Way of Life


, , , , , , , , ,

The nursing profession is notoriously high-pressure profession. Especially in the times we live in now with this corona pandemic. Many patients that nurses encounter are in a grave state of need, and nurses may not always meet their patients’ needs, despite their best efforts. With so many individuals needing a coping mechanism (please read this blog also), it’s no wonder that many people turn to the power of humour and laughter.

Connecting Time – The Healthy Mind Platter (6/8)


Daily Life, Neuroscience, Theoretics


, , , , , , , ,

Connecting time – The healing power of relationships According to Matthew Lieberman, one of the founders of social cognitive neuroscience, our “evolutionary wiring predisposes us to be social,” actually causing a sense of physical pain if we are socially rejected. As such one could argue that social connection is a basic human need, very much like water, food and shelter. social support is a well-documented antecedent of wellbeing.

Humour a Coping Mechanism for Caregivers


Daily Life, Humour, Patients, Way of Life


, , , , , , , ,

Nurses, physicians, and other health care professionals cope daily with the reality and horror of illness, suffering, and death. If you are unable to cope effectively with this, you would experience “a burnout” or more accurately called “a compassion fatigue”. Your compassion and caring may leave you vulnerable to feelings of sympathy for those we serve.

Time In – The Healthy Mind Platter (5/8)


Daily Life, Neuroscience, Theoretics


, , , , , , , ,

Time-in – Reflection, attunement, mindfulness Various studies cited by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in the report “stress at Work” indicate that between 26% and 40% of all workers today feel stressed of burnt out by work. Roughly 60% of doctor visits stem from stress- related complaints and illnesses. Confronted with pressure or stress, the brain strives to reestablish and maintain homeostasis through the coordinated activation and control of neuroendocrine and autonomic stress systems.

Down Time – The Healthy Mind Platter (4/8)


Daily Life, Neuroscience, Theoretics


, , , , , , , ,

Downtime – Disconnecting for integration and insight When explaining “down time” in workshops we found that this is the most counterintuitive component of the Healthy Mind Platter and needs quite a bit of explaining. “Down time” does not correspond with “leisure time” exactly, which is a much broader term which may refer to hobbies and sports. in the Healthy Mind Platter hobbies are more likely to come under “focus time” and sports under “physical time”. With down time we refer to a very specific type of “activity”: